The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022

The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping is a great place to start if you’re new to bookkeeping

The Beginner's Guide to Bookkeeping 2022
The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022

The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022:-  Bookkeeping is the process of keeping track of all a company’s financial transactions. Every financial transaction that occurs during the course of business operations is recorded, classified, and organized by bookkeepers. Accounting is not the same as bookkeeping. The bookkeeper’s books are used in the accounting process to generate the end-of-year accounting statements and accounts.

A simple bookkeeping system that records each financial transaction in the same way that a checkbook does may be appropriate for very small firms. The double-entry accounting procedure is typically used by businesses with more complex financial operations.

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What is the definition of bookkeeping?

The process of keeping track of every financial transaction done by a commercial firm from its inception until its closure is known as bookkeeping. Each financial transaction is documented based on supporting paperwork, depending on the type of accounting system utilized by the company. A receipt, an invoice, a purchase order, or some other sort of financial record proving the transaction took place could be used as evidence.

The bookkeeping transactions can be entered by hand in a diary or with the help of a spreadsheet tool such as Microsoft Excel. To keep books that indicate their financial transactions, most businesses now employ specialist bookkeeping computer applications. To record financial transactions, bookkeepers can utilize either single-entry or double-entry bookkeeping. Bookkeepers are required to do a variety of tasks.

How Does Bookkeeping Differ From Accounting?

In a business, bookkeeping is a crucial, though preparatory, function to the accounting function. A bookkeeper gathers paperwork for each financial transaction, writes it in the accounting journal, categorizes it as one or more debits and credits, and organizes it according to the company’s chart of accounts.

Financial transactions are all kept track of, but they must be summarized at the conclusion of certain time periods. Some companies need quarterly reports. Other smaller businesses may just require reports at the end of the year in order to file taxes.

The accountant takes over at the end of the relevant time period and analyzes, analyses, interprets, and reports financial data for the company firm. In addition, the accountant. The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022

What Do You Need to Set Up Bookkeeping for Your Business?

When it comes to setting up your bookkeeping system, one of the first considerations you’ll have to make is whether to employ a cash or accrual accounting system. You might wish to stick with cash accounting if you’re running a tiny, one-person firm from home or even a larger consulting practice from a one-person office.

You record your transaction when cash changes hands if you utilize cash accounting. When you use accrual accounting, you record purchases or sales right away, even if the money doesn’t change hands for a while. Cash accounting is sometimes used to establish a business and then switched to accrual accounting as it grew. If you’re planning to give your customers credit or ask your suppliers for credit, you’ll need to be prepared.

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When it comes to balancing the books, it’s important to understand assets, liabilities, and equity for Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022

Understanding the firm’s basic accounts is necessary for effective bookkeeping. The chart of accounts is made up of these accounts and their sub-accounts. The accounts that make up the balance sheet of a firm include assets, liabilities, and equity.

Assets are the things that a corporation has, such as inventory and receivables. Fixed assets, such as plant, equipment, and land, are also included in assets. When you look at a balance sheet, you’ll see that the asset accounts are displayed in order of their liquidity. Because cash is perfectly liquid, asset accounts begin with it. The inventories, receivables, and fixed assets accounts follow the cash account. These are real-world assets. You can get close to them. Intangible assets are also present in businesses.

Liabilities are the debts owed by the corporation, such as those owed to suppliers, bank and business loans, mortgages, and any other obligation. Both current and long-term liabilities are included in the liability accounts on a balance sheet. Accounts payable and accruals are common examples of current obligations. Accounts payable refers to the money owed by a company to its suppliers, credit cards, and bank loans. Taxes payable, such as sales tax and federal, state, social security, and Medicare taxes on employees, will be accrued. These taxes are normally paid weekly. Long-term obligations are those with a maturity of more than one year, such as home loans.

The amount of money a business owner and other investors have invested in the company is referred to as equity. All of the owners’ claims against the corporation are recorded in the equity accounts. The business owner has a stake in the company, and it may be the sole one. If the company has taken on additional investors, this will be reflected here.

At the end of the year, you must balance your records in bookkeeping. The bookkeeper must maintain meticulous track of these items and ensure that all transactions involving assets, liabilities, and equity are properly recorded and filed. You can use a simple method to ensure that your books are always balanced. The accounting equation is the name for this formula:

Liabilities + Equity Equals Assets

The accounting equation states that whatever a company owns (assets) must be balanced against claims made against it (liabilities and equity). Liabilities are demands for money owed to creditors and lenders. The remaining assets are subject to claims by the business’s owners (equity).

Revenue, Expenses, and Costs: Income Statement and Bookkeeping

Revenue from sales and other sources, as well as expenses and costs, are used to create the income statement. In bookkeeping, you must record each financial transaction that falls into one of these three categories in the accounting journal. The Beginner’s Guide to Bookkeeping 2022

Revenue is the total amount of money earned by a company from the sale of its goods or services.  All of the money spent by a company to buy or create the goods or services it offers to its consumers is referred to as costs. The Purchases account on the chart of accounts keeps track of the items that have been purchased.

Expenses are any funds used to run the business that are not directly tied to the sale of a product or service. Salaries and Wages, or Selling and Administrative Expenses. are examples of expense accounts.

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Important Points to Remember  

  • The process of keeping track of every financial transaction done by a commercial firm from its inception until its closure is known as bookkeeping.
  • Accounting is responsible for analyzing, reviewing, interpreting, and reporting financial data for a company. The accountant is also in charge of preparing the firm’s year-end financial statements and accurate accounts.
  • When cash changes hands, you record the transaction in cash accounting. When you use accrual accounting, you record purchases or sales right away, even if the money doesn’t change hands for a while.
  • Understanding the firm’s basic accounts is necessary for effective bookkeeping. The chart of accounts is made up of these accounts and their sub-accounts.
  • Assets, Liabilities, Equity, Revenue, Expenses, and Costs are the six basic accounts of a business.